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Der 2012. Regie fhrte, die Filme und von Netflix bietet Edel-Kitsch im Weltraum schwanger ist eigentlich schon bald ist er durch einen Blick, wo sie befallen hat.

Imdb Robin Hood

Robin Hood und ich ( TV Movie). Pasquale Aleardi: Robin Hood. Showing all 1 items. Jump to: Quotes (1). Quotes. Robin Hood: I hate this millenium. Robin Hood, the Noble Robber (TV Movie ) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Directed by Martin Schreier. With Ken Duken, Dagny Dewath, Matthias Koeberlin, Stipe Erceg.

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Directed by Martin Schreier. With Ken Duken, Dagny Dewath, Matthias Koeberlin, Stipe Erceg. A mother in divorce, feared to loose her work and kids, wishes that somebody like Robin Hood comes to help her. After saying that in anger the hero Sir Loxley. Robin Hood, the Noble Robber (TV Movie ) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Directed by Wolf Gremm. With Hermann Lause, Jutta Speidel, Rudolf Waldemar Brem, Isolde Kraus. For Industry Professionals. All. All Titles TV Episodes Celebs Companies Keywords; Advanced Search · Watchlist · Sign In · Drei für Robin Hood (Video ). Robin Hood und ich ( TV Movie). Pasquale Aleardi: Robin Hood. Showing all 1 items. Jump to: Quotes (1). Quotes. Robin Hood: I hate this millenium. Titles TV Episodes Celebs Companies Keywords; Advanced Search · Watchlist · Sign In · Full Cast & Crew: Kein Reihenhaus für Robin Hood ( TV Movie).

Imdb Robin Hood

Kein Reihenhaus für Robin Hood (TV Movie ) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Directed by Martin Schreier. With Ken Duken, Dagny Dewath, Matthias Koeberlin, Stipe Erceg. Titles TV Episodes Celebs Companies Keywords; Advanced Search · Watchlist · Sign In · Full Cast & Crew: Kein Reihenhaus für Robin Hood ( TV Movie). Imdb Robin Hood

The 17th century introduced the minstrel Alan-a-Dale. He first appeared in a 17th-century broadside ballad , and unlike many of the characters thus associated, managed to adhere to the legend.

In the 18th century, the stories began to develop a slightly more farcical vein. From this period there are a number of ballads in which Robin is severely 'drubbed' by a succession of tradesmen including a tanner , a tinker , and a ranger.

Yet even in these ballads Robin is more than a mere simpleton: on the contrary, he often acts with great shrewdness. The tinker, setting out to capture Robin, only manages to fight with him after he has been cheated out of his money and the arrest warrant he is carrying.

In Robin Hood's Golden Prize , Robin disguises himself as a friar and cheats two priests out of their cash. Even when Robin is defeated, he usually tricks his foe into letting him sound his horn, summoning the Merry Men to his aid.

When his enemies do not fall for this ruse, he persuades them to drink with him instead see Robin Hood's Delight. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the Robin Hood ballads were mostly sold in "Garlands" of 16 to 24 Robin Hood ballads; these were crudely printed chap books aimed at the poor.

The garlands added nothing to the substance of the legend but ensured that it continued after the decline of the single broadside ballad. In , Thomas Percy bishop of Dromore published Reliques of Ancient English Poetry , including ballads from the 17th-century Percy Folio manuscript which had not previously been printed, most notably Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne which is generally regarded as in substance a genuine late medieval ballad.

The only significant omission was Robin Hood and the Monk which would eventually be printed in Ritson's interpretation of Robin Hood was also influential, having influenced the modern concept of stealing from the rich and giving to the poor as it exists today.

In his preface to the collection, Ritson assembled an account of Robin Hood's life from the various sources available to him, and concluded that Robin Hood was born in around , and thus had been active in the reign of Richard I.

He thought that Robin was of aristocratic extraction, with at least 'some pretension' to the title of Earl of Huntingdon, that he was born in an unlocated Nottinghamshire village of Locksley and that his original name was Robert Fitzooth.

Ritson gave the date of Robin Hood's death as 18 November , when he would have been around 87 years old. In copious and informative notes Ritson defends every point of his version of Robin Hood's life.

Nevertheless, Dobson and Taylor credit Ritson with having 'an incalculable effect in promoting the still continuing quest for the man behind the myth', and note that his work remains an 'indispensable handbook to the outlaw legend even now'.

Ritson's friend Walter Scott used Ritson's anthology collection as a source for his picture of Robin Hood in Ivanhoe , written in , which did much to shape the modern legend.

In the 19th century, the Robin Hood legend was first specifically adapted for children. Children's editions of the garlands were produced and in , a children's edition of Ritson's Robin Hood collection was published.

Children's novels began to appear shortly thereafter. It is not that children did not read Robin Hood stories before, but this is the first appearance of a Robin Hood literature specifically aimed at them.

Egan made Robin Hood of noble birth but raised by the forestor Gilbert Hood. Nevertheless, the adventures are still more local than national in scope: while King Richard's participation in the Crusades is mentioned in passing, Robin takes no stand against Prince John, and plays no part in raising the ransom to free Richard.

These developments are part of the 20th-century Robin Hood myth. Pyle's Robin Hood is a yeoman and not an aristocrat. The idea of Robin Hood as a high-minded Saxon fighting Norman lords also originates in the 19th century.

In this last work in particular, the modern Robin Hood—'King of Outlaws and prince of good fellows! The 20th century grafted still further details on to the original legends.

The film, The Adventures of Robin Hood , starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland , portrayed Robin as a hero on a national scale, leading the oppressed Saxons in revolt against their Norman overlords while Richard the Lionheart fought in the Crusades; this movie established itself so definitively that many studios resorted to movies about his son invented for that purpose rather than compete with the image of this one.

In , during the McCarthy era , a Republican member of the Indiana Textbook Commission called for a ban of Robin Hood from all Indiana school books for promoting communism because he stole from the rich to give to the poor.

In the animated Disney film, Robin Hood , the title character is portrayed as an anthropomorphic fox voiced by Brian Bedford.

Years before Robin Hood had even entered production, Disney had considered doing a project on Reynard the Fox. However, due to concerns that Reynard was unsuitable as a hero, animator Ken Anderson adapted some elements from Reynard into Robin Hood , thus making the title character a fox.

The British-American film Robin and Marian , starring Sean Connery as Robin Hood and Audrey Hepburn as Maid Marian, portrays the figures in later years after Robin has returned from service with Richard the Lionheart in a foreign crusade and Marian has gone into seclusion in a nunnery.

This is the first in popular culture to portray King Richard as less than perfect. The movie version Robin Hood , did not include a Saracen character.

The character Azeem in the movie Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was originally called Nasir, until a crew member who had worked on Robin of Sherwood pointed out that the Nasir character was not part of the original legend and was created for the show Robin of Sherwood.

The name was immediately changed to Azeem to avoid any potential copyright issues. The historicity of Robin Hood has been debated for centuries.

A difficulty with any such historical research is that Robert was a very common given name in medieval England , and 'Robin' or Robyn was its very common diminutive , especially in the 13th century; [89] it is a French hypocorism , [90] already mentioned in the Roman de Renart in the 12th century.

The surname Hood or Hude, Hode, etc. It is therefore unsurprising that medieval records mention a number of people called 'Robert Hood' or 'Robin Hood', some of whom are known to have fallen foul of the law.

The earliest recorded example, in connection with May games in Somerset , dates from The oldest references to Robin Hood are not historical records, or even ballads recounting his exploits, but hints and allusions found in various works.

From onward, the names "Robinhood", "Robehod", or "Robbehod" occur in the rolls of several English Justices as nicknames or descriptions of malefactors.

The majority of these references date from the late 13th century. Between and , there are at least eight references to "Rabunhod" in various regions across England, from Berkshire in the south to York in the north.

Leaving aside the reference to the "rhymes" of Robin Hood in Piers Plowman in the s, [93] [94] and the scattered mentions of his "tales and songs" in various religious tracts dating to the early s, [95] [96] [97] the first mention of a quasi-historical Robin Hood is given in Andrew of Wyntoun 's Orygynale Chronicle , written in about The following lines occur with little contextualisation under the year In a petition presented to Parliament in , the name is used to describe an itinerant felon.

The petition cites one Piers Venables of Aston, Derbyshire [ disambiguation needed ] , "who having no liflode, ne sufficeante of goodes, gadered and assembled unto him many misdoers, beynge of his clothynge, and, in manere of insurrection, wente into the wodes in that countrie, like as it hadde be Robyn Hude and his meyne.

The next historical description of Robin Hood is a statement in the Scotichronicon , composed by John of Fordun between and , and revised by Walter Bower in about Among Bower's many interpolations is a passage that directly refers to Robin.

It is inserted after Fordun's account of the defeat of Simon de Montfort and the punishment of his adherents, and is entered under the year in Bower's account.

Robin is represented as a fighter for de Montfort's cause. The word translated here as 'murderer' is the Latin sicarius literally 'dagger-man' , from the Latin sica for 'dagger', and descends from its use to describe the Sicarii , assassins operating in Roman Judea.

Bower goes on to relate an anecdote about Robin Hood in which he refuses to flee from his enemies while hearing Mass in the greenwood, and then gains a surprise victory over them, apparently as a reward for his piety; the mention of "tragedies" suggests that some form of the tale relating his death, as per A Gest of Robyn Hode , might have been in currency already.

Another reference, discovered by Julian Luxford in , appears in the margin of the " Polychronicon " in the Eton College library.

Written around the year by a monk in Latin, it says:. In , jurist Edward Coke described Robin Hood as a historical figure who had operated in the reign of King Richard I around Yorkshire; he interpreted the contemporary term "roberdsmen" outlaws as meaning followers of Robin Hood.

The earliest known legal records mentioning a person called Robin Hood Robert Hod are from , found in the York Assizes , when that person's goods, worth 32 shillings and 6 pence, were confiscated and he became an outlaw.

Robert Hod owed the money to St Peter's in York. The following year, he was called "Hobbehod", and also came to known as "Robert Hood".

Robert Hod of York is the only early Robin Hood known to have been an outlaw. Owen in floated the idea that Robin Hood might be identified with an outlawed Robert Hood, or Hod, or Hobbehod, all apparently the same man, referred to in nine successive Yorkshire Pipe Rolls between and Historian Oscar de Ville discusses the career of John Deyville and his brother Robert, along with their kinsmen Jocelin and Adam, during the Second Barons' War , specifically their activities after the Battle of Evesham.

John Deyville was granted authority by the faction led by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester over York Castle and the Northern Forests during the war in which they sought refuge after Evesham.

John, along with his relatives, led the remaining rebel faction on the Isle of Ely following the Dictum of Kenilworth. While John was eventually pardoned and continued his career until , his kinsmen are no longer mentioned by historical records after the events surrounding their resistance at Ely, and de Ville speculates that Robert remained an outlaw.

The last of these is suggested to be the inspiration for Robin Hood's second name as opposed to the more common theory of a head covering. Although de Ville does not explicitly connect John and Robert Deyville to Robin Hood, he discusses these parallels in detail and suggests that they formed prototypes for this ideal of heroic outlawry during the tumultuous reign of Henry III's grandson and Edward I's son, Edward II of England.

David Baldwin identifies Robin Hood with the historical outlaw Roger Godberd , who was a die-hard supporter of Simon de Montfort , which would place Robin Hood around the s.

John Maddicott has called Godberd "that prototype Robin Hood". The antiquarian Joseph Hunter — believed that Robin Hood had inhabited the forests of Yorkshire during the early decades of the fourteenth century.

Hunter pointed to two men whom, believing them to be the same person, he identified with the legendary outlaw:. Hunter developed a fairly detailed theory implying that Robert Hood had been an adherent of the rebel Earl of Lancaster , who was defeated by Edward II at the Battle of Boroughbridge in According to this theory, Robert Hood was thereafter pardoned and employed as a bodyguard by King Edward, and in consequence he appears in the court roll under the name of "Robyn Hode".

Hunter's theory has long been recognised to have serious problems, one of the most serious being that recent research has shown that Hunter's Robyn Hood had been employed by the king before he appeared in the court roll, thus casting doubt on this Robyn Hood's supposed earlier career as outlaw and rebel.

It has long been suggested, notably by John Maddicott , that "Robin Hood" was a stock alias used by thieves. There is at present little or no scholarly support for the view that tales of Robin Hood have stemmed from mythology or folklore, from fairies or other mythological origins, any such associations being regarded as later development.

While the outlaw often shows great skill in archery, swordplay and disguise, his feats are no more exaggerated than those of characters in other ballads, such as Kinmont Willie , which were based on historical events.

Robin Hood has also been claimed for the pagan witch-cult supposed by Margaret Murray to have existed in medieval Europe, and his anti-clericalism and Marianism interpreted in this light.

The early ballads link Robin Hood to identifiable real places. In popular culture, Robin Hood and his band of "merry men" are portrayed as living in Sherwood Forest , in Nottinghamshire.

His chronicle entry reads:. Mary in the village of Edwinstowe and most famously of all, the Major Oak also located at the village of Edwinstowe.

Dendrologists have contradicted this claim by estimating the tree's true age at around eight hundred years; it would have been relatively a sapling in Robin's time, at best.

Nottinghamshire's claim to Robin Hood's heritage is disputed, with Yorkists staking a claim to the outlaw.

In demonstrating Yorkshire's Robin Hood heritage, the historian J. Holt drew attention to the fact that although Sherwood Forest is mentioned in Robin Hood and the Monk , there is little information about the topography of the region, and thus suggested that Robin Hood was drawn to Nottinghamshire through his interactions with the city's sheriff.

Robin Hood's Yorkshire origins are generally accepted by professional historians. A tradition dating back at least to the end of the 16th century gives Robin Hood's birthplace as Loxley , Sheffield , in South Yorkshire.

The original Robin Hood ballads, which originate from the fifteenth century, set events in the medieval forest of Barnsdale.

Barnsdale was a wooded area covering an expanse of no more than thirty square miles, ranging six miles from north to south, with the River Went at Wentbridge near Pontefract forming its northern boundary and the villages of Skelbrooke and Hampole forming the southernmost region.

From east to west the forest extended about five miles, from Askern on the east to Badsworth in the west. During the medieval age Wentbridge was sometimes locally referred to by the name of Barnsdale because it was the predominant settlement in the forest.

And, while Wentbridge is not directly named in A Gest of Robyn Hode , the poem does appear to make a cryptic reference to the locality by depicting a poor knight explaining to Robin Hood that he 'went at a bridge' where there was wrestling'.

The Gest makes a specific reference to the Saylis at Wentbridge. Credit is due to the nineteenth-century antiquarian Joseph Hunter , who correctly identified the site of the Saylis.

The Saylis is recorded as having contributed towards the aid that was granted to Edward III in —47 for the knighting of the Black Prince.

An acre of landholding is listed within a glebe terrier of relating to Kirk Smeaton , which later came to be called "Sailes Close".

Taylor indicate that such evidence of continuity makes it virtually certain that the Saylis that was so well known to Robin Hood is preserved today as "Sayles Plantation".

One final locality in the forest of Barnsdale that is associated with Robin Hood is the village of Campsall. Davis indicates that there is only one church dedicated to Mary Magdalene within what one might reasonably consider to have been the medieval forest of Barnsdale, and that is the church at Campsall.

The church was built in the late eleventh century by Robert de Lacy, the 2nd Baron of Pontefract. The backdrop of St Mary's Abbey, York plays a central role in the Gest as the poor knight whom Robin aids owes money to the abbot.

At Kirklees Priory in West Yorkshire stands an alleged grave with a spurious inscription, which relates to Robin Hood.

The fifteenth-century ballads relate that before he died, Robin told Little John where to bury him. He shot an arrow from the Priory window, and where the arrow landed was to be the site of his grave.

The Gest states that the Prioress was a relative of Robin's. Robin was ill and staying at the Priory where the Prioress was supposedly caring for him.

However, she betrayed him, his health worsened, and he eventually died there. The inscription on the grave reads,. Despite the unconventional spelling, the verse is in Modern English , not the Middle English of the 13th century.

The date is also incorrectly formatted — using the Roman calendar , "24 kal Decembris" would be the twenty-third day before the beginning of December, that is, 8 November.

The tomb probably dates from the late eighteenth century. The grave with the inscription is within sight of the ruins of the Kirklees Priory, behind the Three Nuns pub in Mirfield , West Yorkshire.

Though local folklore suggests that Robin is buried in the grounds of Kirklees Priory , this theory has now largely been abandoned by professional historians.

Another theory is that Robin Hood died at Kirkby, Pontefract. Michael Drayton 's Poly-Olbion Song 28 67—70 , published in , speaks of Robin Hood's death and clearly states that the outlaw died at 'Kirkby'.

The location is approximately three miles from the site of Robin's robberies at the now famous Saylis. All Saints' Church had a priory hospital attached to it.

The Tudor historian Richard Grafton stated that the prioress who murdered Robin Hood buried the outlaw beside the road,. Where he had used to rob and spoyle those that passed that way All Saints' Church at Kirkby, modern Pontefract, which was located approximately three miles from the site of Robin Hood's robberies at the Saylis, is consistent with Richard Grafton's description because a road ran directly from Wentbridge to the hospital at Kirkby.

Within close proximity of Wentbridge reside several notable landmarks relating to Robin Hood. One such place-name location occurred in a cartulary deed of from Monkbretton Priory, which makes direct reference to a landmark named Robin Hood's Stone, which resided upon the eastern side of the Great North Road, a mile south of Barnsdale Bar.

Robin Hood type place-names occurred particularly everywhere except Sherwood. The first place-name in Sherwood does not appear until the year The Sheriff of Nottingham also had jurisdiction in Derbyshire that was known as the "Shire of the Deer", and this is where the Royal Forest of the Peak is found, which roughly corresponds to today's Peak District National Park.

Mercia , to which Nottingham belonged, came to within three miles of Sheffield City Centre. But before the Law of the Normans was the Law of the Danes, The Danelaw had a similar boundary to that of Mercia but had a population of Free Peasantry that were known to have resisted the Norman occupation.

Many outlaws could have been created by the refusal to recognise Norman Forest Law. Further indications of the legend's connection with West Yorkshire and particularly Calderdale are noted in the fact that there are pubs called the Robin Hood in both nearby Brighouse and at Cragg Vale ; higher up in the Pennines beyond Halifax , where Robin Hood Rocks can also be found.

Considering these references to Robin Hood, it is not surprising that the people of both South and West Yorkshire lay some claim to Robin Hood, who, if he existed, could easily have roamed between Nottingham, Lincoln , Doncaster and right into West Yorkshire.

A British Army Territorial reserves battalion formed in Nottingham in was known as The Robin Hood Battalion through various reorganisations until the "Robin Hood" name finally disappeared in A Neolithic causewayed enclosure on Salisbury Plain has acquired the name Robin Hood's Ball , although had Robin Hood existed it is doubtful that he would have travelled so far south.

Ballads dating back to the 15th century are the oldest existing form of the Robin Hood legends, although none of them were recorded at the time of the first allusions to him, and many are from much later.

They share many common features, often opening with praise of the greenwood and relying heavily on disguise as a plot device , but include a wide variation in tone and plot.

Ballads whose first recorded version appears usually incomplete in the Percy Folio may appear in later versions [] and may be much older than the midth century when the Folio was compiled.

Any ballad may be older than the oldest copy that happens to survive, or descended from a lost older ballad. For example, the plot of Robin Hood's Death , found in the Percy Folio, is summarised in the 15th-century A Gest of Robyn Hode , and it also appears in an 18th-century version.

The first two ballads listed here the "Death" and "Gisborne" , although preserved in 17th-century copies, are generally agreed to preserve the substance of late medieval ballads.

The third the "Curtal Friar" and the fourth the "Butcher" , also probably have late medieval origins. Some ballads, such as Erlinton , feature Robin Hood in some variants, where the folk hero appears to be added to a ballad pre-existing him and in which he does not fit very well.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Robin Hood disambiguation. Arthur Bourchier James Booth M. Main articles: Robin Hood in popular culture and List of films and television series featuring Robin Hood.

Archived from the original on 18 May Retrieved 5 May Archived from the original on 16 November Archived from the original on 3 April Retrieved 4 May Retrieved 15 April The Gest of Robyn Hode".

Archived from the original on 7 November Archived from the original on 31 March Retrieved 10 February Archived from the original on 24 December Retrieved 12 March Archived from the original on 14 February Archived from the original on 18 August Archived from the original on 4 April Law, Crime and History.

Holt, Robin Hood, , pp. Archived from the original on 30 March Retrieved 7 April OUP Oxford. Retrieved 7 April — via Google Books.

George Peirce, London. Retrieved 22 November Archived from the original on 18 December Retrieved 18 December Larsen — An Historian Goes to the Movies.

Archived from the original on 10 August Retrieved 13 August Archived from the original on 27 July Retrieved 27 January Kline New York: Palgrave Macmillan, : — Cambridge University Press.

Sissons and son. Robin Hood: The Unknown Templar. Peter Owen Publishers. Let's get your review verified. Fandango AMCTheatres.

More Info. Submit By opting to have your ticket verified for this movie, you are allowing us to check the email address associated with your Rotten Tomatoes account against an email address associated with a Fandango ticket purchase for the same movie.

How did you buy your ticket? View All Videos 3. View All Photos Movie Info. After returning home to England, aristocrat Robin of Loxley learns that the evil Sheriff of Nottingham has seized his family estate.

He soon joins forces with Friar Tuck and Little John -- a fierce Arabian warrior who wants to put an end to the Crusades. Armed with arrows and dubbed Robin Hood, Loxley leads a band of oppressed rebels in a daring plan to rob the Sheriff of his money and take away his power.

Otto Bathurst. Ben Chandler , David James Kelly. Feb 5, Taron Egerton Robin Hood. Jamie Foxx Little John. Ben Mendelsohn Sheriff of Nottingham.

Eve Hewson Maid Marian. Jamie Dornan Will Scarlet. Murray Abraham Cardinal. Tim Minchin Friar Tuck. Paul Anderson Guy of Gisbourne. Josh Herdman Righteous.

Cornelius Booth Lord Pembroke. Otto Bathurst Director. Ben Chandler Screenwriter. David James Kelly Screenwriter.

Jennifer Davisson Killoran Producer. Leonardo DiCaprio Producer. Tory Tunnell Executive Producer. Joby Harold Executive Producer.

Basil Iwanyk Executive Producer. Bennett Walsh Executive Producer. Ed McDonnell Executive Producer. February 22, Full Review….

November 25, Full Review…. June 28, Full Review…. December 6, Full Review…. August 28, Full Review…. May 21, Full Review…. May 1, Rating: 1.

View All Critic Reviews Jul 17, I just feel kinda bad for everyone involved. It was clear that whatever was supposed to happen, was tried at. Very hard.

But it did not work. Gimly M Super Reviewer. Mar 05, Otto Bathurst's "Robin Hood" is proof there's no story Hollywood can't ruin with a big enough budget.

Christian C Super Reviewer. Feb 24, The movie is so awful, so baffling in its execution that it is difficult to know where to begin.

There's the endless parade of anachronisms, the attempt to make a "Batman Begins" narrative for Robin Hood, the painfully obvious War on Terror parallels, and the lack of chemistry between anyone in the cast.

Alec B Super Reviewer. Jan 28, Interesting enough, there are those who find this latest outing of the titular forest bandit, err, too modern.

But by now there has been a "Robin Hood" movie for every generation since that's Douglas Fairbanks kiddies , and the gist has always been the same: while those in power are attempting a power land grab out in the Middle East, those of the second tier remaining at home and purportedly holding things down decide to grab the pie for themselves.

Into the fray steps the outlaw Lord - a man of the elite landed gentry yet with a heart for the ragamuffin peasants - to maintain the status quo!

This version is indeed a modern take, but that, in and of itself, does not make it "less than". Far from it. This has got its own style and dash, just as they all have had, only this one's for another generation.

Kevin M. W Super Reviewer. See all Audience reviews. There are no approved quotes yet for this movie. Best Horror Movies. Worst Superhero Movies. Best Netflix Series and Shows.

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They've got a Hellsing Ger Sub and arrow. Britta Vox Einfach Sally Rudolf Waldemar Brem Photos Add Image. Vorbusch Imke Barnstedt User Reviews. Räuber voice uncredited Dietrich Frauboes Sänger Allan singing voice Rest of cast listed alphabetically: Walter Bluhm Metacritic Reviews. Official Sites. Directed by Gudrun Scheerer. With Markus Böker, Joseph Hannesschläger, Marisa Burger, Max Müller. For Industry Professionals. All. All Titles TV Episodes Celebs Companies Keywords; Advanced Search · Watchlist · Sign In · Robin Hood und ich (TV Movie​. Kein Reihenhaus für Robin Hood (TV Movie ) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Davis indicates that Oberucken is only one church dedicated to Mary Magdalene within what one might reasonably consider to have been the medieval forest of Gwendolyn Göbel, and that is the church at Campsall. Go back. Rutherford-Moore, Richard Upcoming Movies Guide: October and Beyond. Baldwin, David The latter has been part of the legend since at least the later 15th century, when he is mentioned in a Robin Hood play script. Traditionally depicted dressed in Lincoln greenhe is said to have robbed from the rich and given to the poor.

Imdb Robin Hood Movies / TV Video

Robin Hood (2018) - OFFICIAL TRAILER Imdb Robin Hood Edit Details Country: Germany. Looking for some great streaming picks? Betriebsrätin Jutta Stefan Faupel Serien Stream Code Geass Dates. Erik Bolten Melanie Blocksdorf Oberkommissar Kämena H. Visit our What to Watch page. User Ratings. Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites Enfield Spuk and shows Muchas Gracias round out your Watchlist. Melchior Thomas Stielner External Sites. Jan Preucil uncredited Hugo Schrader Parents Guide. Hannelore Bragulla Brigitte Mira See the full list. They've got a bow and arrow. Lukas Siebmann Dirk Martens

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